New research shows emotional impact of diabetes

Today marks World Diabetes Day. This was first started in 1991 jointly by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organisation.

 

Research unveiled today by Diabetes UK has highlighted the emotional and mental issues that comes with diabetes.

 

”Out of 8,500 people surveyed, three in five five said that their condition made them feel down, and only three in ten said that they felt in control of their diabetes.”

 

The charity has called upon the UK Government to radically improve health outcomes for people with the illness. This will by committing to sustain funding at current levels of £44 million, until at least 2021.

 

The chief executive of Diabetes UK, Chris Askew, spoke of the importance of being able to help sufferers with the emotional consequences of the condition:

 

“Effective diabetes care requires that a person’s emotional needs are taken into account alongside their physical care needs,” said Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK.

 

Diabetes is a lifelong incurable condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to go too high, of which there are two main types:

 

Type 1 diabetes is typically developed in childhood, and is due to a lack of insulin which means the body cannot control the amount of sugar that is in the bloodstream. In most cases of treatment, regular injections of insulin are required to help regulate blood sugar levels.

 

Type 2, the most common type, is where the body does not make enough insulin to work properly or when the body doesn’t react to insulin.

For more information on the symptoms, causes and further treatment of both types of diabetes.

 

 

Insulin allows the cells in the muscles, fat and liver to absorb sugar that is in the blood.
Source: Flickr

 

Diabetes is a key factor in causing disability and creates a greater risk of heart diseases and other health issues. The 2016 Scottish Diabetes Survey estimates that there were around 300,000 people in Scotland with diabetes at the end of 2016.

 

The main theme behind World Diabetes Day 2017 is Women and Diabetes, about broadening access for women for the healthcare options that they need. According to the International Federation for Diabetes:

 

‘’There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040.’’

 

The IDF believe that more needs to be done to provide girls and women with the support they need in societies where men tend to find getting support easier and quicker, as well as tackling other inequalities such as dieting and physical activity.

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