Beast from the East no match for determined NHS Scotland staff

Although the Beast from the East caused havoc for many across Scotland, a new report has shown that NHS staff were not harmed from treating almost nine out of 10 patients in target time.

A red weather warning was issued in parts of Scotland when icy blasts hit the country with snow; but that didn’t stop NHS Scotland from seeing – and either admitting, transferring and discharging A&E patients within the targeted time of four hours.

NHS Sign

Image credit: Getty Images

Although this still falls short of the Scottish Government’s targets of having 95% of patients seen within this time, Health Secretary, Shona Robison, was full of praise for the “tremendous effort” put in by the hospital staff.

She said:

“In the face of the red weather warning, NHS staff worked tirelessly to ensure A&E departments continued to run with almost nine out of 10 patients admitted, discharged or transferred within the four-hour target.

“This was a tremendous effort, and thanks to staff across the NHS who have experienced their busiest winter in a decade and continue to go the extra mile to give people the care they need.”

red weather warning

Red weather Warning is issued for Central Scotland as the country is hit by the Beast from the East. Feb 28 2018 Image Credit: SWNS

Despite the extreme snowfall, the performance of A&E staff on A&E waiting times increased from the previous week, when a lesser 87.5% of cases were dealt with in four hours.

Ethel Hardie, a Community Psychiatric Nurse in the Aberdeenshire area, said that she is amazed by how her team stepped up during the bad weather.

She said:

“Most community teams stepped in to help each other during these times, often staying additional hours past their finishing times, or people who live close to hospital coming in on days off to cover.

“It never ceases to amaze me despite the poor wages, nurses remain dedicated to their patients with little thanks.”

However, despite the efforts put in by NHS staff, some nurses felt that they were being forced to travel in unsafe conditions to get to work.

The community nurse added:

“I think it’s a disgrace that we have to use our annual leave if we are unable to get to work due to weather conditions.

“In this day and age we should be able to use this as paper work day, or work from another facility like teachers do.

“Hours logged could be monitored via computers.”

Even though staff struggled to get to and from work, the Health Secretary remained positive about the performance of Scotland’s health services.

She said:

“Hospitals saw incredible pressures this week with staff struggling to get in or out of work and patients unable to get home, and this level of disruption will take time to recover.

“However, our A&E departments are still the best performing in the UK, as they have been for the past three years, thanks to our record investment and increased levels of staffing into our hospitals.”

Karen Mitchell, a District Nurse also from the Aberdeenshire are, said she believes that the commitment from NHS staff was the sole factor in keeping NHS Scotland running efficiently.

She stated:

“The beast from the east caused havoc for the NHS across the UK.

“With hospital appointments and operations cancelled, the resourcefulness and resilience of staff ensured patients were cared for throughout.

Staff from Glasgow Royal Infirmary spent the night at the hospital to make sure there was staff there at all times | Image credit: Evening Times

“Community teams were faced with dangerous conditions in remote areas to reach patients – sometimes on foot –  who were vulnerable to ensure patient safety was maintained.

“The team spirit demonstrated commitment to patient care, with as little disruption as possible.

“This proves our NHS is invaluable, and the hard work and commitment of staff is what keeps it running despite pay freezes and staff shortages.”

Staff nurse Claire Woods, who works at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, agreed that NHS staff went above and beyond to provide care for their patients.

“Some staff had to stay the night at the hospital to ensure they were able to be at work the next day, with staff also staying hours after their shifts ended until the next staff member arrived to assure that patient safety was maintained”, she said.

Members of the public took to Twitter to express their support for Scotland’s NHS.  Twitter user @ticgran expressed there thanks to the NHS through a tweet saying: “Well done NHS Scotland. I love the care at home which enable me to stay at home and get amazing treatment.”

Twitter user @ticgran complimented the NHS’s care | Image credit: Twitter user @ticgran

Graham Pattie also took to Twitter to share his praise for the NHS adding: “NHS Scotland. Still out-performing the rest of the UK.”

Twitter user Graham Pattie shares his pride in NHS Scotland on Twitter | Image credit: Twitter user @GrahamP58

A spokesperson for the British Medical Association Scotland (BMA) also expressed their gratitude for the “extraordinary lengths” that the NHS staff went to in order to care for their patients.

They stated:

“Doctors and other NHS staff went to extraordinary lengths to provide care to their patients throughout the disruption caused by the recent extreme weather. Some staff slept in hospitals to continue looking after their patients, while others made long and difficult journeys to reach their place of work.

“The lengths that NHS staff went to shows the dedication they have to their jobs and to their patients and should be applauded.”


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