Rising Deaths Due to Alzheimer’s

New figures for fundamental occurrences registered in Scotland during the fourth quarter of 2017 were published today by the National Records of Scotland and portray that 12,821 births, 5,975 marriages and 15,198 deaths were registered between the months of October and December.

The number of births was 1.3% fewer than the same period in 2016 and the lowest fourth quarter total since 2000.

The number of deaths registered was 4.3% more than the same period in 2016 and the highest fourth quarter total since 2003.

NRS also released details regarding the cause of deaths compared with the fourth quarter of 2016 as shown below:

In positive terms, deaths from coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease have decreased considerably. However, the number of deaths from cancer and respiratory disease has risen marginally.  There has been a relatively large increase in the number of deaths from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease with these deaths now accounting for more than 10 per cent of all deaths compared to 5 per cent a ten years ago. Ben Cooke, an NHS staff nurse said

“With an ageing population, dementia and Alzheimer’s are becoming more and more prevalent.”

The number of marriages registered was 391 (6.1 per cent) less than in the fourth quarter of 2016.  There was a rise of 20 (9.6 per cent) of same sex marriages compared with the same period of 2016.  Thirty-one (13.6 per cent) of the same sex marriages registered in the fourth quarter were changes from civil partnerships.

Figures for the whole of 2017 will be finalised and issued in June.

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