May’s Brexit speech – as it happened

May delivers Brexit speech in Grimsby, a town in which the majority voted leave.

May begins by stating that Brexit “belongs to the whole country.”

The PM states that the Brexit deal will allow us to “build stronger communities” and will mean growth is not focussed in London and the South-East.

May then goes on to talk about foreign affairs and “taking back control”. She insists Brexit would not be a “race to the bottom” in terms of workers right and that Britain after Brexit will still be able to safeguard them.

May then goes on to note how well her government are managing the economy, stating: “the employment rate is at a record high, unemployment rate is at a 40-year low, borrowing this year is at a 17 year low and debt is falling.”

She says that businesses would begin to invest and money spent on a no-deal exit could be put to better use. There would be a giant “open for business sign” in Britain.

May talks about the failure to get her deal through parliament back in January and claims Corbyn “opposed it because he wanted a general election,” meanwhile other MPs opposed it because they didn’t want Brexit to happen altogether.

Speaking to the EU, May says “now is the time for us to act” and calls for “one more push” to get Brexit over the line.

She says that MPs also need to think hard about rejecting the deal and that more talking isn’t going to solve anything. She continued, saying that the EU might start imposing conditions which could result in a form of Brexit that looks different to what people voted for. A second referendum would “take Britain back to square one”, she claims.

May is ramping up the pressure, saying ‘Let’s get it done’.

She needs the support of those who voted remain but accept the result – and those who voted Leave but accept some compromise is necessary.

The Prime Minister now takes questions from journalists.

When asked how much responsibility she takes for the uncertainty, May says she negotiated a deal and MPs were the ones who rejected it. Now is the moment to get this done, she says.

Workers rights and the energy deal will be good for Grimsby (where she is holding the speech), she adds.

She then takes her leave.

 

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