A Wonderful World Cup in Japan

By Fergus Robb

With the Rugby World Cup 2019 in Japan drawing to a close, it is nearly time to reflect on the ups and downs of the tournament to assess just how well the hosts have done.

Trials, tribulations and typhoons have filled the Japanese air during this tournament, and the World Rugby association board has come under a lot of scrutiny.

There is no doubt the brave blossoms of Japan have been fan favourites during this World Cup and have captured the heart of many a neutral rugby fan.

The Japanese culture is another aspect of the experience which has made this World Cup such an intriguing and exciting one.

With England and South Africa ready for a final showdown in the final game on Saturday, it is time to beg the question – was this a successful Rugby World Cup?

The tragedies of typhoon Hagibis left a lot of Japan in disarray. More importantly, World Rugby put safety at the forefront and cancelled games to ensure fan and game personnel’s security.

The typhoon caused major destruction across the country with flooding and structural devastation claiming lives.

World Rugby assured fans prior to the tournament that there would be typhoon contingency plans put in place, however many saw no such signs of this.

As a result of the poor planning on World Rugby’s behalf, some games were cancelled, upsetting fans on a global level. In one specific case, the Italy v New Zealand game being called off robbed the Azzurri of any chance to qualify for the knockout rounds and prevented a number of their experienced players from having a final send-off.

Outwith the devastation of the typhoon, the rugby world can agree that Japan have succeeded in hosting the tournament. The efficiency of those in charge has meant that, apart from the forced game cancellations, everything has run rather smoothly.

The stadiums, transport, fan zones and host cities were all ideal for a tournament such as this. The Japanese culture of respectfulness and joy was well reflected throughout the World Cup and could be seen upon the faces of many a fan during the games.

The success of the host nation during their campaign is hoped to have inspired a new generation of Japanese rugby players, as well as having caught the eye of every rugby fan in the world.

So, despite the minor setback of the most devastating typhoon to hit Japan in 60 years, the country was an excellent host for the Rugby World Cup. This tournament has played host to some of the most shocking rugby upsets and most entertaining games of the last few years.

With Wales and New Zealand fighting it out on Friday for the bronze medal, it is between England and South Africa to see who lifts the Webb Ellis Trophy come Saturday morning.

Regardless of these results, Japan, as a country, will end the tournament on a high and deserve to pat themselves on the back for a job well done as tournament hosts.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: