Is it possible to balance raising a baby with saving the planet?

Raising a baby while striving to be sustainable is not something that typically goes hand-in-hand. Where babies are concerned, much waste is produced just from everyday life whether that be from nappies, dummies or clothes they have outgrown.

Climate change has become increasingly prominent in the minds of people throughout the country, so it should come as no surprise that many parents have turned to eco-friendlier ways to raise their children.

The environmental cost of having a child is significant and as a result, more parents are taking the initiative to try and limit the impact their child has on the the planet’s health. Being environmentally conscious is not an easy feat – but it is possible.

Credit: The Bebe Hive

Mum of one, Fiona McKay, has bought most of her daughter’s essentials second-hand.

“I want my daughter to grow up in a world better than the one she came into. I’ve been pretty aware of overconsumption and climate change for a long time, but getting pregnant really focused me.”

As well as taking the necessary steps in her own purchases, she has also asked her family to do the same when it comes to presents. “We’ve asked for second-hand or wooden toys when people have asked about gifts. We also bought her cot, changing table, buggy, bouncer chair, etc., second-hand.”

“People feel they need to buy presents for a baby and although we’ve been very good at not buying things ourselves,” she admitted, “it’s crazy the number of new things we still received.”

When it comes to the cost of raising her daughter this way, Fiona said that although it might be more expensive to begin with, it ends up working out cheaper in the long-run.

Credit: The Bebe Hive

The Bebe Hive is one shop that has successfully catered to this market since 2017. This online shop is run by mother of two, Lauren Rigby, and works together with many different ethical and sustainable businesses from across the globe in order to bring its customers great, high-quality products to help them become eco-friendlier.

Rigby’s shop aims to allow its customers to shop “consciously and sustainably for their little people” and this is highlighted by the products that they sell, such as: rubber dummies, silicone bibs, and wooden and sustainable-based toys.

 

Laura understands that parenting is stressful enough without trying to be completely sustainable but she stresses that “little changes will make a big difference.”

“I do think if people understood more about the choices they make and the options and alternatives available, then they would be more willing to prioritise the topic of sustainability.”

Adopting a sustainable lifestyle whilst raising your children is not easy but it is definitely possible if you have the means and determination to do it.

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