2019 BAFTA Nominees

The 72nd British Academy Film Awards will take place this Sunday, February 10th.

The Favourite leads with 12 nominations, followed by Roma and A Star is Born, which are both up for 7 awards.

Here’s a look at the key nominees:

 

You can find a full list of nominees for all awards here.

The BRIT Awards: A brief history and a look at 2019’s nominees

The 2019 BRIT Awards are set to take place on Wednesday 20th February. The BRIT Awards, run by the British Phonographic Industry, have taken place every February since the second awards ceremony in 1982.

The first BRIT Awards Ceremony took place in 1977 to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee and covered the previous 25 years of music.

In the run-up to the biggest annual pop music awards in the UK, here’s a look at the most notable BRIT Awards moments over the years:

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This year’s events kick off next week as some of the nominees are set to perform in small venues as part of BRITs week in partnership with War Child.

Since 2014, The BRITs have become a bigger event, consisting of a number of concerts in the run-up to the awards ceremony.

BRITs Week 2019 starts on Monday. The week-long event will give fans the opportunity to see some of the biggest names in music in intimate venues across London in order to raise money for War Child. Last year, the BRITs Week shows raised around £650,000 for children whose lives have been torn apart by war.

The year’s BRITs Week bill includes chart-toppers The 1975, Bristol rock band IDLES, Critic’s Choice 2018 nominee Mabel.

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This years BRITs Week Line Up (Credit: www.brits.co.uk)

BRIT AWARDS (4)This year’s prestigious Critic’s Choice Award goes to indie-rocker Sam Fender. The Geordie singer-songwriter has charmed the nation with his powerful social justice anthems this year. Sam is the first nominee to receive this year’s BRIT Award, designed by Sir David Adjaye OBE.

 

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I'm truly humbled to win the BRITS critics choice award, being nominated was already crazy enough never mind winning. I want to say a few thank yous, firstly to everyone that voted for me, I'm gobsmacked. To my manager and brother Owain for taking a punt on an 18 year old kid who screwed school up and had no direction. How the hell you saw this in me back then still baffles me. To my band for your relentless work ethic, we've played literally hundreds of shows this year, we've worked bloody hard and we're gonna work even harder next year. Lastly, and most importantly, to my fans, I've met a lot of you over the course of this mental year, and I have to say it has truly been an honour to get up and play night after night to such a wonderful collective of people. Here's to next year! ❤️

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BRIT Award nominees are selected and voted for by music industry professionals, but the public have a say on who walks away with the British Artist Video award and British Breakthrough Act.

Voting is open for another week for both British Artist Video of the Year and British Breakthrough Act here.

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A look at this years BRIT Award nominees. (Credit: Tumblr)

Netflix’s Sex Education bares all

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Asa Butterfield as Otis Milburn and Ncuti Gatwa as Eric Effoing in Sex Education. (Photo credit: Sam Taylor/Netflix)

Netflix’s latest original series Sex Education has been praised for its unapologetic diversity and honest portrayal of teenage life.

The show, set in Wales, follows the sixth form students at Moordale Secondary School, specifically the awkward and eternally embarrassed Otis Milburn, who’s mother happens to be a sex therapist.

On the surface, as the title suggests, the show is about the sexual relationships of Moordale’s students, as accidental sex expert Otis teams up with bad-girl Maeve Wiley to set up their own underground sex clinic in the schools asbestos ridden bathrooms.

But Sex Education tackles so much more than that, exploring all aspects of growing up as the students learn more about each other’s personal lives through their involvement in the clinic and end up standing up for each other in many instances.

The charm of the show is how honest it is, managing to be funny, awkward, unpolished and real all at once.

The best thing about the show is that every single character is explained, from star athlete Jackson Marchetti, to troubled bully Adam Groff, to popular girl Aimee Gibbs, every character has been carefully crafted to prove a wider point, that everyone has their own things going on no matter who they appear to be.

It also showcases a huge variety of relationships, from Otis and best friend Eric’s touching childhood friendship, to popular Aimee’s unlikely comradery with Maeve and Adam’s fractured relationship with his headteacher father.

Sex Education is incredibly heartwarming, as difficult issues surrounding sexuality, abortion and family circumstances are handled with such care. Unlike most teen dramas, Sex Education is careful not to sensationalise these difficult aspects of life or simply use them as a plot device. The difficult parts of the programme are explained, considered and make you care for the young characters who are trying to find their way.

The show has also been praised for being so diverse, with strong female characters, positive male friendships, racially diverse characters, LGBT+ characters and a focus on LGBT+ sexual relationships.

Sex Education strikes the perfect balance between being humorous, educational and incredibly thought provoking and touching. It will break your heart then patch it right back up again with this warm fuzzy feeling in just a matter of minutes.

It is the funny, warm breath of fresh air the world needed going into the new year and, judging by the ending of this series, we might be seeing more of the Moordale students in the near future.

The Highlands named as top world destination for 2019 by Lonely Planet

The Highlands and Islands have been selected as one of the top places in the world by Lonely Planet.

The beautiful landscape helped place the region in the top 10 of Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel list for 2019.

The guide named the Highlands “one of the wildest, least inhabited and most scenic parts of Europe”. The “innovative and fast-developing” accommodation across the Highlands is another reason for the area’s high ranking.

Lonely Planet’s guide recommends looking out for a number of animals native to the area including red deer, golden eagles, otters and whales.

The Highlands have long been a popular destination. They are home to Britain’s largest National Park, Britain’s highest peak, Ben Nevis, and a stunning coastline.

We found out where else in Scotland visitors should be sure to check out, by asking the public the most beautiful places they have been.

 

 

Should we have the right to our own image?

A mind-boggling scenario was brought to light in an Instagram post by Gigi Hadid last week. The model was forced to delete a photo from her Instagram page after her manager informed her that she was being “legally pursued” for posting a photo of herself taken by a paparazzi.

Hadid had found the photo uncredited on Twitter and had posted it to her Instagram account. She even said that she would have given credit to the photographer had they come forward and asked her to. Her frustration was clearly directed at the money-making tendencies of the paparazzi.

The model also shed light on the fact that some of her young fans who have Instagram accounts dedicated to her have had their accounts suspended or have been sued for posting images taken by the paparazzi.

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A valiant flock of celebs have rallied by Hadid’s side since her post, describing similar instances where they have been sued for posting their own faces. Kylie Jenner commented: “We’re ‘public figures’ and it’s legal for them to invade our privacy. It’s pretty disappointing. We gotta change this,” whilst Emily Ratajkowski reposted Gigi’s post.

This is a complex issue to come to terms with. The job of the paparazzi is to photograph and circulate images of celebrities in the media, so choosing to sue a celebrity that posts your photo seems backwards and paradoxical. Surely, we should all have the right to post a photo of ourselves no matter who took it, but there is no law in place to make this the case. Anyone, not just the paparazzi, who takes a photo, owns that photo through copyright law and is liable to sue for improper use.

Here is how the law currently stands:

 

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The law surrounding the paparazzi in England changed significantly after Princess Diana’s death in 1997. Despite her death being the result of a car accident, she was being chased by intrusive paparazzi at the time. A Gallup poll from 1997 reveals that 43% of the UK public thought that the photographers were responsible for the collision.

After Diana’s death, the Protection from Harassment Act became an important way for celebrities to arm themselves against the paps; as did the Press Complaints Commission, who carefully reviewed its press regulations.

There have been many more examples of safety being a key worry, both for celebrities and for the paparazzi. In 2013, a paparazzi was killed when he was run over whilst trying to photograph Justin Bieber in his car.

There are also some bizarre examples of copyright law which are now being questioned. In 2015, PETA attempted to sue a photographer for posting a ‘selfie’ that a monkey had taken. They argued that publishing and selling the photographs that the monkey had taken infringed his copyright. Earlier this year it was decided that, as a monkey, Naruto couldn’t own the copyright for the pictures.

However, the issues brought up last week pose a new, contemporary set of problems. These are issues that arise as products of the internet era. They have raised the question of whether traditional copyright rules are perhaps outdated in the time of platforms like Instagram and other photo sharing sites.

The issues raised by Hadid prove that there is a flaw in the law if we don’t even own the rights to photos of our own faces. Perhaps the law now actually acts in favour of paparazzi rather than the subjects of their taunting. The question is, can we fight for the right to have control over unsolicited pictures of our own faces, and what will protect us when fighting for this right?

 

 

 

 

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