The BRIT Awards: A brief history and a look at 2019’s nominees

The 2019 BRIT Awards are set to take place on Wednesday 20th February. The BRIT Awards, run by the British Phonographic Industry, have taken place every February since the second awards ceremony in 1982.

The first BRIT Awards Ceremony took place in 1977 to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee and covered the previous 25 years of music.

In the run-up to the biggest annual pop music awards in the UK, here’s a look at the most notable BRIT Awards moments over the years:

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This year’s events kick off next week as some of the nominees are set to perform in small venues as part of BRITs week in partnership with War Child.

Since 2014, The BRITs have become a bigger event, consisting of a number of concerts in the run-up to the awards ceremony.

BRITs Week 2019 starts on Monday. The week-long event will give fans the opportunity to see some of the biggest names in music in intimate venues across London in order to raise money for War Child. Last year, the BRITs Week shows raised around £650,000 for children whose lives have been torn apart by war.

The year’s BRITs Week bill includes chart-toppers The 1975, Bristol rock band IDLES, Critic’s Choice 2018 nominee Mabel.

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This years BRITs Week Line Up (Credit: www.brits.co.uk)

BRIT AWARDS (4)This year’s prestigious Critic’s Choice Award goes to indie-rocker Sam Fender. The Geordie singer-songwriter has charmed the nation with his powerful social justice anthems this year. Sam is the first nominee to receive this year’s BRIT Award, designed by Sir David Adjaye OBE.

 

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I'm truly humbled to win the BRITS critics choice award, being nominated was already crazy enough never mind winning. I want to say a few thank yous, firstly to everyone that voted for me, I'm gobsmacked. To my manager and brother Owain for taking a punt on an 18 year old kid who screwed school up and had no direction. How the hell you saw this in me back then still baffles me. To my band for your relentless work ethic, we've played literally hundreds of shows this year, we've worked bloody hard and we're gonna work even harder next year. Lastly, and most importantly, to my fans, I've met a lot of you over the course of this mental year, and I have to say it has truly been an honour to get up and play night after night to such a wonderful collective of people. Here's to next year! ❤️

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BRIT Award nominees are selected and voted for by music industry professionals, but the public have a say on who walks away with the British Artist Video award and British Breakthrough Act.

Voting is open for another week for both British Artist Video of the Year and British Breakthrough Act here.

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A look at this years BRIT Award nominees. (Credit: Tumblr)

Brainstorm: It’s 25 Years Since The KLF Caused Hell

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It has been 25 years since the 1992 Brit Awards when electronica pioneers The KLF were given the honour of kickstarting proceedings at the award ceremony.

The duo performed ‘3.a.m. Eternal’ with grindcore act Extreme Noise Terror in front of many music business executives in suits, with several important figures either stunned or disgusted at the move.

Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty of The KLF had planned on chucking sheep’s blood over the audience before being met by several BBC lawyers to prevent such a grotesque antic. Instead, Drummond was acting as a demented, limping cigar-chomper who fired blanks from a M16 gun into the crowd. Following their performance, The KLF’s narrator and promoter Scott Piering announced over the PA system that “The KLF have now left the music business”.

The chaos didn’t stop there. The duo planted a dead sheep at the entrance of the ceremony afterparty with a note tied around its waist that said: “I died for you – bon appetit.”

The KLF then officially retired three months after the series of stunts at the Brit Awards and burned a million pounds to emphasise their contempt at the music industry, as well as deleting their entire discography.

At the start of 2017, rumours of The KLF reuniting were fuelled by a poster in Hackney, London with a heading that proclaimed ‘2017: What the F**k Is Going On?’ A return for the duo is disguised as The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu, with something commencing on 23rd August 2017.

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