Edinburgh, Electric Cars and You

The UK Government announced earlier this week that it would be bringing their proposed ban on the sale of petrol and diesel cars forward by 8 years to 2032 – the same year proposed by the Scottish Government.

This means that any cars purchased after this date must be ‘effectively zero emission’; one solution for this is the use of electric cars.

But is Edinburgh ready for an electric revolution?

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map2Asset 16@6x-100If you can’t charge at home you can use a charging point.

These are dotted around the country and are easy to find with services such as Zap Map that give you a run down of the charging options available in your area.

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Edinburgh isn’t exactly short on chargers. There are around 20 sites within three miles of the centre, almost double the amount of petrol stations.

But there’s a catch.

This is how long it takes to refill the different types of vehicle

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and when you consider that in Edinburgh,

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twenty charging points might not be enough.

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After the Department of Transport announced that the electric car subsidy was being cut by £1000 in November, a surge of last minute applicants has left the fund ‘days away’ from running out.

If electric cars are to be the future then Edinburgh Council, Holyrood and Westminster have a long way to go to reach the 2032 deadline.

Beating the boobie blues

Three local artists help to raise awareness of breast cancer

Left to right: Kathleen Moodie, Jennifer Colquhoun and Beth Lamont.

Step 1: Touch. Step 2: Look. Step 3: Check. T-L-C. While there is no definitive method for checking your breasts for signs and symptoms of breast cancer, UK charity Breast Cancer Now are asking you to try a little TLC. Early detection is crucial in treating and beating the disease – most cases of breast cancer are first found by women themselves.

This October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and fundraising events have been taking place across the country to support this issue. On 19th October, three Edinburgh-based artists got together at Custom Lane in Leith to raise money and awareness for a disease that one in eight women in the UK will develop in their lifetime.

The collaborative project, Boobzapalooza, headed by knitwear designer Kathleen Moodie is a ‘month-long celebration of all things breast’. Together with scientific illustrator Jennifer Colquhoun and ceramic jewellery designer Beth Lamont, they have designed limited-edition boob-related art that will be sold throughout the month with 40% of the proceeds going directly to Breast Cancer Now.

The Boob Arc Necklace, K.Boobs Booble Hat and The Boob Print are all for sale throughout October.

What made you choose this particular breast cancer charity?

Kathleen Moodie: “I have a friend who was diagnosed with breast cancer at 24 and she’s an ambassador for Breast Cancer Now and she suggested to go for them. Partly because they are registered in Scotland as well, so the money is coming from Scotland and staying in Scotland, that for her is something that is really important. It was something that none of us had thought of. We just thought, ‘oh, yeah we’ll pick a breast cancer charity and it will be great’, and Victoria said, ‘you’ve got to make sure it’s a Scottish one’ and it makes so much sense.” 

Breast Cancer Now is the UK’s largest breast cancer charity.

The event is about making breast cancer less scary and approaches the disease in a fun and direct way. Why is that important?

Jennifer Colquhoun: “Last year, I found a lump in my own breast and I was terrified. I thought that was me because a few years ago my aunt died of breast cancer, so it was in the family. But it turns out mine was a fibroadenoma which is a benign tumour. It’s also commonly known as the breast mouse which I thought was hilarious. I really wanted to do a picture of the breast mouse but nobody really knew what I was talking about.”

A customer tries on Kathleen Moodie’s Booble Hat.

Why do you think the arts is a good way of talking about and addressing big issues such as breast cancer?

Beth Lamont: “I guess it just gives it a tangible thing. You can still donate money, but you get to take something away. The next time someone is wearing their pink necklace someone can be like, oh I like that’ and you can be like, ‘oh it was actually for this charity’ and you talk about it again. Though they are only on sale for the month that conversation will hopefully keep on going because of that product, that piece of art, that hat, is not going to go away.”

The Boobzapalooza event held at Custom Lane, Leith.

The limited-edition pieces are available throughout October and can be purchased online here.

 

Review: Jack White at the Usher Hall

Kris Krug

Jack White doesn’t allow photography during his show, so this generic image will have to do. Credits to Kris Krug

There’s a reason this article doesn’t have any photos — it’s because Jack White wouldn’t let me take any.

It was a drunken night of crazy antics as Jack White blew into the Scottish capital like an American hurricane, and in a matter of hours, he was gone again – leaving some audience members baffled and others enthralled. Whether he started the show already drunk, no one will know, but he definitely ended it that way. Swigging champagne like there was a grape draught, playing his guitar with said bottle and then tearing down half his set up, I couldn’t tell if I found his music entertaining or if it was just his unpredictable stumbling.

His music was not the clearest, only his greatest hits were completely audible, but that was arguably decades of muscle memory — playing Seven Nation Army every night since 2003 would drive me to the bottle too. Sixteen Saltines and Steady, As She Goes were perfection but the rest of the show was a little rough around the edges. He stumbled around, tearing down the cymbals, screaming into the microphone to the point that the feedback was almost deafening, conducting his band (he never uses a set list, he just reads the room), acting like a total diva, but then the nicest man would come through when he actually addressed the crowd.

He went from crazed drunkard to concerned busker so quickly it could give you whiplash.

When he came out for the encore (which he waited way too long to come out for), he proclaimed that he would play until 11pm and if anyone needed to leave, to get the last train home, then please feel free to leave. Not the Jack White who ran around the stage leaving guitars on the floor before reaching for his bottle of champers again.

Just before the end of the show, he got the support act Demob Happy on stage to jam through a song (or two, it was hard to figure out when one song stopped and another started) and profusely thanked the crowd, and blessed them, their family, their friends, all of Edinburgh and all of Scotland… the only person he forgot to bless was the family cow. He then embarked on a half hour encore (it was a two and a half hour show, getting your money’s worth) and scaled the piano (yes, he scaled it, almost crashed off of it trying to smash his guitar and then stepped off it in a very lacklustre fashion, probably realising he was too smashed himself).

Special mention has to go out to Jack White’s tech, who spent more time on stage than off, untangling him after he’d done his laps of the stage, and tuning his guitar every time he dropped it, fixing his microphone set up when he trashed it, and just generally saving the day when instruments got in Jack’s way.

All in all, it was a very entertaining show, but if you came for the music and not the full Jack White experience, then you might be left disappointed. Just don’t expect to use your phone to take photos of him or take a phone call, because he doesn’t like that either – he makes you lock your phone away before the gig even starts. It’s all Jack White or nothing at all.

This bearded lady is the future of drag

“Hello, my name is Mystika Glamoor, and I’m everything you want me to be, darling.”

Gender is dead and people are living for it. The drag community in Edinburgh is rapidly growing and drag queens are being requested left and right.

The latest news in the Edinburgh drag scene is that the gender-bender queen, Mystika Glamoor, now has her very own show called ‘Glamoor! Kweer Kabaret’ at ‘The Street’ bar.

When Mystika isn’t living for the applause in crazy wigs, he is an artist, film director, and painter who goes by the name of Oskar Kirk Hansen. The half British, half Danish entertainer was born in Thailand, spent most of his teenage years in Italy and studied in Denmark.

Now, Mystika has finally made a home for himself after moving around the world. After just a year of doing drag, he was performing at said bar when he was asked: “Do you want this to be your home, and perform here once a month,” to which he replied: “I´ll do it once a week”.

From now on, he will take to the stage every Monday, and present you with a unique collection of performers. Bearded ladies, biological woman, burlesque dancers and performers who don’t fit into any categories, will not only make you laugh and cry hysterically, but also encourage you to think.

“I want to spread my influence around the world, and when you look like this, you are going to get a reaction,” Mystika said. “Even if that I just someone screaming faggot at you from across the room, or a drunken straight girl saying she loves me.”

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Mystika Glamoor/ Oskar Kirk Hansen hosting The Kweer Kabaret at The Street

Last night Mystika entered the stage wearing a cotton-candy-pink wig and holding a vintage microphone, “Hello, fellow heterosexuals.”

A screaming crowd, consisting of drag queens, drag kings, boys who like boys, girls who like girls, transgender men and woman, and — of course — the ever-so-loud straight girls, greeted him with laughter.

At ‘Glamoor! Kweer Kabaret’, bearded ladies, biological woman, burlesque dancers and performers who don’t fit into any categories, will make you laugh and cry hysterically, but will also encourage you to think.

One of the first things you might notice about Mystika is that he has a beard. He likes to explore the different dimensions of femininity and masculinity.

“My makeup is very thick and very theatrical in some ways,” Mystika explained. “I did try some prettier looks, but after seeing other drag queens dealing with people hitting on them, I decided that I don’t want that.

“Looking like this is giving me that extra confidence because I don’t have to conform to a certain beauty standard.”

Drag queens can suit every taste, from camp and crass to high fashion. Some look like Barbie, while others might give you a fright from their obscure look.

The thing about drag is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously, but at the same time, it’s deeply rooted in politics and it’s subversive. That might be why the art form is so captivating. They are not only entertaining a crowd, but the queens are also on a mission to humanise drag, fight for equality and challenge gay stereotypes.

“I hope people understand that it is an art form and that it’s political. It’s one of the most political art forms because it’s saying: ‘Hey! I don’t have to be the way you think I have to be’.”

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Rayna Destruction/ Jordan Phillps performing on the stage of Kweer Kabaret

Most people think that drag queens are just men who dress in women’s clothing and act like ladies. That’s not always the case, and definitely not in Mystika’s: “I think the conception we have about masculinity and femininity are not exactly dead, but they are not all that is out there.

“I identify mostly as a man, but I can identify as a woman sometimes too. I can turn into a woman, a trash monster or anything I want to be.

“In a way, I feel that labels are limiting and that people saying you have to pick one or the other, is ignorant and just wants to put you in a box.”

It’s at shows like the Kweer Kabaret that people — who usually feel like outcasts – can finally fit in. Here you can wear what you want, love whom you love and be who you are – or who you want to be for that matter.

“The main thing about drag is showing that in the end, it´s not all that serious. If I can be myself dressed like this, then you can accept yourself for who you are.

“I’m here to show you that you can be different and that it’s okay. We should show people that there is more out there, whether you are straight, gay, just coming out, or deeply homophobic.”

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Consumer confidence in Scotland lowest in over a year

Consumer confidence levels in Scotland have dropped to the lowest it has been in over a year, and below the UK-wide average, new research indicates.

According to the latest Deloitte Consumer Tracker, Scotland’s consumer confidence results have dropped to a net balance of  -9%, which is lower than the UK average of -7%.

Scotland’s result has dropped a whole four percentage points since the last quarter. This is the lowest it has been since the second quarter of 2017.

Some local business owners in Bruntsfield, Edinburgh responded to the research, and were surprisingly optimistic about their customers, despite the recent findings.

Gavin Elden, A La Carte owner, said: “Even when times are tough, people just want to have treats, so we haven’t noticed too much of a change.

A La Carte on Bruntsfield Place. Credits to Daisy Smith

“However, there has been a huge change around here, and lots and lots of shops have changed hands.

“It is hard to tell with Brexit. I think the whole country is just uncertain at the moment about everything. It could be fantastic or it could be a disaster.”

Clementine Home and Gifts worker, Monica, said: “I would definitely think Brexit will have an effect. Everyone is talking about it and I will probably be affected because I am from Poland.

Clementine on Bruntsfield Place. Credits to Daisy Smith

“My friends are all concerned and it definitely has an impact on how people view their future here and spending as well because people are saving instead of spending just in case.”

Cat Anderson, Edinburgh Bookshop worker, said: “I was talking to the boss the other day and she is really impressed with how much people are shopping and she puts it down to Brexit.

The Edinburgh Bookshop on Bruntsfield Place. Credits to Daisy Smith

“People are just like we don’t care anymore, we are going to live regardless, we don’t know what is coming next so we might as well just enjoy ourselves.

“I have certainly seen a massive increase in food prices and have changed my shopping habits accordingly. Brexit is definitely having an impact.”

In Scotland, five out of the six measures of confidence dropped compared to the last quarter. The measure which grew in confidence was regarding job opportunities and career progression which rose by four percentage points to -4%.

The main reason for the downfall in consumer confidence was plunging levels of optimism regarding general health and wellbeing. This category dropped 18 percentage points down to -16% since the previous quarter. This was closely followed by a steep drop in levels of confidence around household disposable income which fell to -24%.

Levels of confidence fell in all six categories for the UK-wide results. The sharpest decline was in the category regarding disposable income and personal debt.

Deloitte chief economist Ian Stewart, related the downfall to Brexit and said: “The reality of higher inflation and August’s interest rate rise has dented optimism about spending power.

“Meanwhile uncertainty and the manner in which the UK exits the EU in less than six months’ time is creating an additional headwind for consumers.

He added: “That such consumer-friendly conditions have failed to boost confidence testifies to the headwinds from inflation, interest rate rises and Brexit.”

 The survey was carried out between September 21 and 29 and involved 3105 consumers across the UK, with 371 being in Scotland.

 

Scottish Storytelling Festival: It’s time for a story

It’s time for a story. The 30th annual Storytelling Festival comes to Edinburgh for the end of October to celebrate the diversity and tradition of storytelling over ten days under the blanket theme of Growing Stories.

This time of year is the perfect opportunity to place emphasis on stories while families are drawn into the warmth of the fire as the days grow colder. As summer fades and autumn strips the trees bare of their beauty you feel a sudden desire to take up a good book with a mug of hot chocolate to satisfy the internal chill you feel during this seasonal change.

They say that ‘stories are like gardens’: they grow and blossom with each passing generation. This idea weaves through the festival under the theme of Growing Stories. It also provides a perfect platform to feed the creativity and imagination of storytellers and spread it across Scotland.

Throughout the festival, there will be many creative workshops, daytime events for all the family, and intimate evening readings to feed the mind. I attended the Breathing Space workshop on October 21 for a chance to take part in nature while learning about the Pictish Kingdom of Fife. Storytellers told tales of piracy against the Romans across the east coast, their deep roots entwined with the Celts and the importance and trees and plants in Pictish life. Carvings uncovered across Scotland detail their methods of hunting using dogs and falcons. The Picts eventually combined with the Gaels of Dal Rieta to form the Kingdom of Alba, now known as Scotland.

Some of the festival’s main events taking place across Edinburgh include:

Transforming Voice – Scottish Storytelling Centre

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Scottish Storytelling Centre. Photo By Ross Hempseed

Several people have defined what it means to use your voice effectively and who have not let theirs be silenced such as Mahatma Gandhi and Rosa Parks, who steadied the winds of controversy to achieve what they truly believed in. They did not use violence to win the battle but instead won the war of the words.

“When the whole world is silent, even one voice becomes powerful.” – Malala Yousafzai.

Led by storyteller Diane Edgecomb, it shows you how to use one’s voice to strengthen relationships and communicate better with others. This interactive and engaging workshop will help the audience become more in tune with their own unique voice.

The event takes place on Wednesday October 24 at 11am and will last five hours.

Tickets – £16.00

Spark 100 – Walking tour departing from Mercat Cross

Edinburgh’s amazing architecture and history have long since been a place to inspire many influential writers and timeless stories. Robert Louis Stevenson was inspired for the character Long John Silver in Treasure Island by a man he met in the Edinburgh Infirmary with a wooden leg.  J.K Rowling famously wrote the first chapters of the Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone at the Elephant House café in Old Town, Edinburgh and completed the last Harry Potter novel in room 552 of the landmark Balmoral Hotel.

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is often celebrated as one of the most influential Scottish novels of the 20th Century. Muriel Spark, the author, was inspired and educated in Edinburgh and her education was a major part in developing both the characters and the setting of the novel. To mark the 100th anniversary of her birth, Spark 100 was organised to guide fans and tourists around places in Edinburgh that were significant to a Scottish hero who paved the way for women in a male-dominated environment.

“How wonderful it feels to be an artist and a woman in the twentieth century.” Muriel Spark

Walking tour takes place on Saturday October 27 at 1:30pm and will last 90 mins

Tickets – £13

With so many wonderful events in and around Edinburgh, it’s no wonder many people are travelling just to delve deep into the fictional lands of stories and mythology only to regret waking up to reality.

 

Interview: Forrest Can’t Run

Edinburgh-based rockers launch debut EP with a bang.

The five-piece pop-punk outfit has been around for about a year and a half now, wowing various venues across the capital. Their debut EP “Time Will Tell” launched Friday so now you can be wowed at home, too.

EN4 News caught up with the guys after a loud and energetic launch show at Edinburgh’s Opium Nightclub. We spoke about their songs, their shows, and what the future holds.

The Band

  • Danny Crawford – Vocals and Frontman
  • Cal Carruthers – Lead Guitar
  • Ross Jenkins – Normal Guitar
  • Lewis Connell – Bass Guitar
  • Simon Drummond – Drums

EN4 News: Before I forget to ask, where exactly can we find your EP? Where is it available?

Danny: Spotify, Deezer, Apple Music

Ross: Amazon, Google Play. (Laughing) KKBOX

EN4 News: What was that last one?

Ross: I just looked up “Forrest Can’t Run” on Google, and it turns out we’re available on KKBOX, it’s a Southeast Asian streaming service. We have no idea how it got there.

EN4 News: During the show you said you’re on Guitar Hero as well? How did you manage that?

Danny: Basically one of my mates, Liam [On Twitch as Docy93] is one of the best Guitar Hero players in Scotland. He remastered an MP3 of us into Guitar Hero and Plays our stuff during his live streams.

EN4 News: So tonight’s gig: how was that for you guys?

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Forrest Can’t Run onstage at Opium.

Lewis: It was unreal.

Danny: I’m very tired, let’s put it that way. The crowd was amazing! To hear them singing our songs back to us was so cool.

Simon: I really enjoyed it, absolutely class.

Danny: It wasn’t just one song either, it was stuff that wasn’t even on the EP release! That was awesome. Mainly because I was really out of breath, and couldn’t sing, so it’s nice to have someone do my job for me. The crowd was probably my favourite thing about the night.

EN4 News: How was recording the EP? Quick and easy or do you all hate each other now?

Danny: Well… (Laughing)

Ross: We recorded two songs back in April, with another drummer who’s left us, and then the two other ones in August with Simon.

Simon: Yeah, I’m technically just the poor substitute.

Danny: “Masquerade” and “Voices” were produced with Mark Morrow Audio. “Stephanie” and “Time Will Tell” were done with a band called Woes who’ve been really helpful.

EN4 News: How have they helped?

Danny: Two of the guys from Woes, Luke and Sean, they took our stuff on a tour they did.

Simon: The tour was for an album they’ve just released.

Danny: Yeah, so after we recorded with them they did all the production, basically made the magic . Really cool. And the EP art was Laurence Crow, I’ll throw that in there as well.

EN4 News: You seem very well organised for only being together for 18 months. Is there any one of you that’s especially behind that?

Danny: If any of you say me I’ll hate you. But I…

Lewis: It’s actually mainly me and Ross.

Danny: What? No.

Cal: I help as well though. So does Simon.

Danny: What?!

Cal: I guess Danny does too.

Danny: Shut up! Ok, I suppose in terms of the merch, (Buy It Here!), that’s all of us. Logos and art is Ross. We even have a band bank account, me and Lewis do that. Lewis brought a card reader too for selling our stuff.

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Lewis Connell on Bass (Right), Danny Crawford on Vocals (Left), and Simon Drummond on Drums (Centre).

Danny: But really, in regards to organisation…

Ross: None of us, really.

Danny: If you look at our band group chat, it’s mostly me telling people what to do and trying really hard not to seem like an arse about it. I try to take charge, but the big decisions are left to the band.

Lewis: And I make sure they’re not crap decisions.

Danny: (Laughing) That’s fair, Lewis does quality control. My job is just making sure everyone does what they’re supposed to. I can be pushy about it but it’s mostly teamwork.

EN4 News: Last big question: what does the future hold for you guys?

Danny: Dunno.

Ross: Album.

Lewis: Album!

Cal: Album.

Simon: Yeah, album.

Danny: Well, we need to write new songs for it first. Maybe music videos too?

Ross: Yeah, We’ll hopefully have a video by early next year.

Lewis: Possibly a Christmas song?

Danny: God no. Anyway, the main idea is to get some new tunes put together, and hopefully also a tour at some point – we’d love to get down to England and play across Scotland. It’s all about broadening our horizons, you know?

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Clockwise from left: Cal, Simon, Lewis, Ross and Danny.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Police launch hunt for robber targeting women in Meadows

The Meadows

Police have launched an online appeal after two robbery incidents in the Meadows area of Edinburgh.

Police believe the two incidents are connected and the robber appears to be targeting young women in the area.

The robber was described as a young adult male and believed to be Scottish.

The first incident occurred on Sunday October 7th at 2am where two females, aged 22 and 20, were threatened by the robber.

The robber stole the 22-year-old’s mobile and made his getaway on a bicycle.

And later that day at around 8pm, the robber made a second attack where he threatened a 23-year-old woman and stole another phone from the victim near the Meadow’s tennis courts.

The suspect was described as wearing a hoodie but described as grey in the first incident and then black in the second. However, he was known to be wearing a balaclava in both cases.

Detective Inspector Bruce Coutts said: “These were shocking incidents which we’re currently treating as linked and, as part of our ongoing enquiries, we’re urging anyone with information which may be able to help to get in touch.

“Other people were in the park at these times and are likely to have seen the suspect. We’d urge these people, or anyone who may recognise the suspect’s description, to come forward as soon as possible.

“I want to reassure the public that there will be an increase in high visibility police patrols in the area and would urge anyone who see’s suspicious behaviour to speak to an officer or call 101, always dialling 999 if you see a crime ongoing or if you believe a suspect is in the vicinity.”

EN4 News spoke with locals in Edinburgh to find out how safe they feel in the Meadows.

Fast fashion, faster damage

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Clothing and shoes collection bins will hopefully encourage people to donate their unwanted items to charity.

Fast food, fast cars and now there is even fast fashion – a contemporary term used for the cheap and trendy throwaway clothes we buy from budget retailers. These garments might be perfectly good at the time of purchase, but they soon both fall apart and out of fashion. According to Fashion Focus, it is estimated that we now buy 40% of our clothes at ‘value’ retailers. These fast fashion suppliers – the majority of whom solely allow online shopping – have not just stomped their stiff, faux-leather boot adorned foot down on the high street, but they have also left a muddy carbon footprint in their wake.

Recent findings from the Environmental Audit Committee show that Britons are the number one consumer of new clothes in Europe, and the number of items we are purchasing has doubled in the last ten years. Campaigners for sustainability Wrap have highlighted that 300,000 tones of clothing are binned every year. Of these easily re-useable clothes, 80% are piled in a landfill and the other 20% are incinerated, releasing toxic chemicals such as azo dyes, chlorinated solvents, lead and mercury into the air.

Last week, MPs reported that they are growing increasingly worried about the UK’s penchant for buying new clothes and the many repercussions this has on the environment. In their report, MPs said the fashion industry was now a leading producer of the greenhouse gases that are over-heating the planet. MPs have since reached out to a number of retailers, urging them to consider the various approaches they can take to drastically reduce fast fashions’ destructive impact on the environment.

Andrew Pankhurst, Re-use Campaigns Manager for Zero Waste Scotland, emphasised the importance of fashion retailers taking immediate action:

“We all know buying brand new products can be tempting, but we have to think about our limited natural resources and the impact of our waste as we fight the ever-increasing threat of climate change.

“With the public and businesses more attuned than ever to the problems caused by linear consumption, there has never been a better time to be making the case for making things last and getting maximum value from our resources.”

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Clothes will a lot of life left in them can be found in charity and vintage shops.

In Edinburgh, steps are being taken to find solutions and alternatives to fast fashion, with its various sustainable fashion choices for shoppers. The capital boasts a vast array of vintage boutiques, natural wool knitwear stores and even shops such as Godiva and Totty Rocks, who use locally sourced fabrics to custom make pieces – which can take up to three weeks – ‘slow fashion’ is more fitting here.

Edinburgh & Lothians’ Regional Equality Council, who work to promote human rights and sustainability, have been hosting weekly clothing repairs and alterations drop ins. At 1:30pm on Wednesday 10th September, they have organised a swap shop event at Kings Church on Gilmore Place and encourage the people of Edinburgh to bring items in exchange for other items of their choosing. They also hope to launch a sewing club in the coming months.

Project Coordinator, Jean-Matthieu Gaunand said:

“The fashion industry is a great contributor to climate change. The industry emits as much greenhouse gas as all of Russia. At Edinburgh and Lothians Regional Equality Council, we encourage people from diverse communities to repair and re-sew their clothes rather than constantly buying them new.

“Our clothing repair service is run by an expert Kurdish tailor who has over 15 years of tailoring experience. She has done wonders and the feedback from participants has been excellent. I invite everyone to drop in.”

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People can take their clothing to Edinburgh & Lothians’ Regional Equality Council’s weekly drop-in to ve

Elsewhere in the city, one student is pro-active in push against fast fashion. Edinburgh College of Art Jewellery and silversmithing student Daniela Groza is the curator of an annual ethically-conscious

fashion show, R Sustainable Fashion. She has recently been appointed the student ambassador for the Ethical Making Pledge, founded by the Incorporation of Goldsmiths. She explains what the group’s objectives are:

“We want to ensure that the materials used in our workshops not only come from ethically sourced roots, but also that we are creating a safe environment for ourselves, such as eliminating chemicals such as citric acid and finding substitutes.

“Also, thinking about recycling and reusing precious metals – re-melting and turning into a new piece, creating multi wearable jewellery, thinking about the material flow; where it came from, digging to its roots, but also considering where it will end up, putting emphasis on a circular economy.

“As a jewellery student who is interested in fashion, it is my responsibility to take these issues into consideration given the damages produced to our world by both the textile and the extractive industry.”

In the quick isn’t quick enough society of today where everything is available at the simple click of a button, the temptation of ‘buy now, wear tomorrow’ can be hard to resist. However, next time you are about to hit ‘checkout’, perhaps stop to ask yourself – do you really need another Boohoo dress? Your purse and the planet might just thank you for it.

What’s happening in October

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Picture of October cocktail at a pop-up bar in Edinburgh. Photo by Rachel Lee.

Five events to get you off your couch!

It might feel like winter is just around the corner with the recent onset of autumnal weather, but that doesn’t mean you should be mourning the death of your social life and going into hibernation just yet! Edinburgh has many amazing events and places to try in October. Whether you’re looking for foody, spooky or boozy, we’ve got you covered.

The Spooky One

It’s impossible to get through October without thinking about Halloween, and if you don’t want to be at the beck and call of trick-or-treaters, then it’s best to hit the town for the night. The Rocky Horror Picture Show will be on at the Edinburgh Playhouse at the end of the month, so getting dressed up and dancing the night away has never been easier. This infamous show, which is part of a sell-out world tour, is sure to impress. The show is only in town for six days, starting on October 28th, so make sure to get your ticket to hell soon. Get your fishnets on and get ready to party.

The Foody One 

If you’re lusting over bygone holidays or for the trips you never got to take, then why not take America to Scotland. The City Café offers a little taste of the States without the hefty flight prices. Adorned with neon lights and memorabilia, their menu serves all the American delights you can think of with pretty wallet-friendly prices too. Go for a heft milkshake or their killer sweet potato fries.

The Boozy One 

If you feel like you’ve tried every tipple in Edinburgh, then The Pop Up Geeks will always prove you wrong! Their bar is in the same location as their last temporary treasures (The Stranger Thing’s ‘Upside Down’ and the Rick and Morty inspired wubba-lubba-dub-dub) but the theme changes every few months. This month, they’re running a Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory event between October 15thand 21st. Don’t look for a golden ticket, it’s a glossy wristband you need to enter this magical world.

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Picture of Afternoon Tea at The Dome in Edinburgh. Photo by Rachel Lee.

The Classy One

The Dome might seem like a really classy joint, but it’s the perfect place to spoil yourself if you’re looking for a bit of TLC. Its afternoon tea is an experience in itself and the Georgian Tearoom, where it’s held, is luxurious and opulent. The perfect treat to get you out of the house. You don’t need to break the bank to feel like royalty.

 

 

The Educational One 

The International Storytelling Festival kicks off for its 30th year on October 18th with a jam-packed agenda of 66 events local to Edinburgh, covering everything from Scottish folklore to the Scottish Suffragette movement to children’s literature. For those who are feeling inspired, there are a variety of workshops available too, so you can get stuck into all the action. With something on offer for everyone, this festival is sure to satisfy even the fussiest of readers.

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