Too Good To Go hits Milestone with over 1 million meals saved across the UK

By Beth Murray

Launched in the UK in 2016, the app Too Good To Go has a focus to combat global warming by reducing food waste. Globally, the organisation has saved 21,440,629 meals from being wasted since its launch.

Hayley Conick, UK Managing Director said: ‘While we are thrilled to have hit this milestone, the 1 million meals saved so far is just the tip of the iceberg. Seven million tonnes of edible food is wasted in the UK every year and we are on a mission to change this.’

The concept is simple – cafés, restaurants, hotels and bakeries sign up to the service in a bid to reduce their food waste. Members order a Magic Bag from the café they fancy and pay a significantly reduced price, usually between £2.30 and £4. The bag is made up of a selection of surplus food which would otherwise be thrown away at the end of the day.

Image by Beth Murray

Pirlous café, on the Grassmarket in Edinburgh, is one of the dozens of establishments in the city that use the service. They provide a magic bag costing £3.39. One specific bag contained two full baguettes, each valued at £4.50.

While picking it up, the manager, Jackie, gave some thoughts on the service: ‘In terms of food waste, it does save us from throwing away a lot. However, occasionally we find ourselves losing money as we have sold out of food during opening hours, which means we are making up fresh food for the bags.’

She went on to explain that while she agrees with the goal of the company, it has flaws which are often overlooked: ‘When the rep first came in, we were told they would provide us with all of the packaging we would need, that hasn’t happened so now we have to consider how much money is being spent on packaging the food.’

Jackie also expressed worries that expectations of consumers can often be too high: ‘People need to remember that while they may have expected more food, they are still getting a significant reduction and food which is still fresh.’

Food waste in Britain is a growing problem with over 10 million tonnes of food being thrown away every year. Last month alone, Too Good To Go saved 116,619 meals in the UK.

To put it into perspective, when one baguette is thrown away it is the equivalent of wasting a bath full of water. Saving one meal saves the planet from 2.5kg of CO2 – CO2 being one of the leading causes of global warming.

beth too good to go - Subbed

In a survey conducted by To Good To Go in March this year, it was discovered that almost 69% of UK adults do not know the extent to which food waste contributes to global warming.

Too Go To Go have set a Global Movement with a series of aims to meet by 2020. These include increasing the number of app users, encouraging more businesses to get on board, educating young people on the importance of valuing resources and fighting labelling policies across supermarkets and business as expiry dates are the cause of 10% of all food waste across Europe.

They are currently working on a food waste movement specifically aimed towards the UK. This will include new figures, content and tips to help more people across the UK understand the importance of reducing food waste in the fight against climate change.

Interview: Ayshia Taskin

Edinburgh artist wants to reduce food waste and global hunger – one corn puff at a time.

Ayshia - Rachel

Artist Ayshia Taskin (Photo Credit: Rachel Lee)

Meet Ayshia Taskin. She’s a mother, an artist, a wife, a student – and now, thanks to her recent project, an engineer.

With her installation performance art piece, Paradise Corns, Ayshia hopes to prompt visitors into conversations about the impact food waste and modern day corporate consumerism has on world hunger. Paradise Corns – the name of the machine Ayshia built herself – churns out edible corn puffs which visitors of the exhibition are free to help themselves to.

When I first encounter Ayshia, she envelopes me in a friendly hug. In the interview below, Ayshia passionately discusses the personal connection Paradise Corns has to her and about her hopes of a world in the not-too distant future where food waste has drastically reduced and everyone is happy and healthy with a full belly.

I thought that was all my life was going to work in hospitality, I never thought I was going to be an artist. I’m the first in my family on both sides to go to university. I’m really lucky because my husband took the brunt financially, he told me to finish university and focus on my art. Luckily I got funding to go to Venice, there are some really supportive tutors at ECA. I always try and keep myself and my work down to earth. It gives me a good worth ethic.

I think what happens in your childhood really affects you when you grow up. When I was a kid in Cyprus, me, my brother and sister would see the British tourists with an abundance of food and enjoying their holiday. I think that sticks in my brain that I was born in Britain but only had a bit of couscous to eat. It is very surreal to look back on.

Ayshia - credit to Ayshia

“Paradise Corns” produces an abundance of corn puffs (Photo Credit: Ayshia Taskin)

When I look and see people still starving in 2018 when we shouldn’t be – we have all these factories and mechanisms to make things available to people – it’s very irritating in my mind the way the system works and they don’t necessarily want everyone to have an abundance of food or anything because it’s all about the capitalist system. I think we are at a point where we don’t need capitalism anymore. There’s enough food in the world but it’s not distributed properly.

I don’t like to see the waste. It’s unnecessary. In the West we are so disconnected from other countries who don’t have access to food at all. If everyone was just more aware of the rest of the world, and how people in the world are struggling to survive then things will change.

“Paradise Corns” is the amalgamation of performance, multi-sensory methods, i.e. olfactory senses, sight, smell, taste and auditory. Visual stimuli in the form of video and the literal production of food – auditory stimulation in the form of the sounds of the milling machine, extruder and videos. I created a set of films as part of the Paradise Corns project that are inspired by adverts from the 90s. They were very child-focused…bright colours…very appealing. ‘You can have this, when you want it’…but not really if you don’t have any money. It helped create a spoiled society and food waste.

I harbour a fascination of mass food production and consumerism. When I watch documentaries about starving people, food waste, countries unable to feed their people and my son asks, ‘well why don’t we just send food’. I always think ‘yeah we could, but that’s not going to sustain them’. People need to eat everyday so if I make a machine, you can make a machine too.

Ayshia-Taskin-Paradise-Corns - credit to Ayshia

Ayshia constructs her masterpiece (Photo Credit: Ayshia Taskin)

I didn’t study engineering but I built a machine. It shows that women can engineer things. I’m not an engineer – I’m not even good at basic mathematics – but when you have such a desire to make something or do something for a purpose you just have to go for it.

Women are held back from doing engineering jobs because they don’t have the belief they can do it because it’s so historically male dominated. I think we have to encourage girls from young age to be interested in engineering and building things. The logic brain is considered masculine and the creative side of the brain is considered the feminine, sensitive side. To this all starts at childhood, so I think it’s important for parents and teachers to give girls mechanical sets.

We should all try our best but it shouldn’t be the sole responsibility of individuals. The Council should provide more outdoor space to grow your own things – fruits, vegetables, corn – whatever! It’s more sustainable. I would love for anyone to be able to walk into a supermarket and buy whatever they want and to have an abundance of food, but it’s just not possible.

I set up a free-for-all pantry in the studio. I wouldn’t say it was me, I would just do it. I set myself a budget of five pounds a week to get as much as I can and then everyone can help themselves. People in the studio can add to it they want but not forced to, or don’t have to spend as much as a fiver.

With Paradise Corns, I’m creating the food waste and I want it to look shocking. The project has so many layers. I don’t want to tell people what to take away from it – they may want to just take a corn puff! But I hope the work inspires people to question how food is made and consumed so we can create a future where people do not starve.

%d bloggers like this: