Scotland Under-20s players relishing the opportunity to play England in front of Myreside crowd in mini Six Nations clash

 

Scotland Under-20 head coach, Sean Lineen, has made two changes to the starting 15 ahead of this evening’s clash against England at Myreside.

Loose-head prop Thomas Lambert comes in for Alex Maxwell, while tight-head prop Mak Wilson takes the spot of Dan Gamble.

The Scots go into the fixture off the back of a tough 38-26 loss to reigning champions Ireland in Dublin last weekend, while their counterparts arrive in Edinburgh sitting second in the table following a 29-24 away victory over France.

“They’re very physical, powerful players, and they play at a very high standard,” Scotland starting hooker Ewan Ashman said of the English opposition.

“They’ve got a lot of Gallagher Premiership players in their squad. So it’s going to be very physical up front, and the boys are going to really have to stick together on this one.”

Ashman, who was the top try scorer in last year’s Under-20 World Championships, comes into this campaign as one of the leadership figures in the squad.

His role sees him pair new captain Rory Darge in leading the forward pack.

Darge concurred with his teammate in his estimations of the England side, telling EN4 News: “They’re big, big players and a lot of them play at a really high level, so they’ll understand what it takes to win games.

“They’ll come at us with a lot of physicality and power. The challenge for us is just to match that as best we can and get into them.”

The Scotland boys will have their foothold in the match boosted by the fact that the encounter will be taking place at George Watson’s Myreside stadium, a ground known for the close atmosphere it can create.

“It’s a really good atmosphere at Myreside, the stand is almost on top of you, so if there is a good crowd there then that’ll be awesome,” Darge said.

Scotland need a win to keep their slim hopes of a title win alive, while stopping rivals England from retaining their Calcutta Cup crown.

Edinburgh Rugby seeking to build new stadium

Edinburgh Rugby is exploring the possibility of building a new stadium next to BT Murrayfield stadium.

It is understood the club are looking to construct a 7,000 seat “mini-Murrayfield” on the training pitches next to the home of Scottish rugby.

The capital side have been in search for a permanent home for some time. Temporary stadiums used by the club have included Murrayfield, Meadowbank and their current location Myreside.

Scottish Rugby has seen interest rise in the past year with the national side fortunes improving on the pitch. Myreside stadium holds a max-capacity of 5,500 with temporary stands being used for Edinburgh Rugby games.  Any increase in match attendances would force the SRU to invest in improving facilities at Myreside to accommodate fans.

Fans have been calling for the team to move to a permanent stadium to build a strong base and would likely appeal to rugby fans living in the east of Scotland. Editor of Scrum Magazine, Stuart MacLennan believes the proposal would be a good step:

“I think it would be of great benefit to the club and the surrounding area. Every sporting club wants their own home and this could help build a culture.  I don’t think it’s ideal that they play at Myreside and it’s much better alternative.”

Many issues stand in the way of the proposals that could prevent the move going ahead. Miller Developments owns part of the SRU’s land and would likely need to be consulted before constructions plans could take place.  The Murrayfield ice rink and Murrayfield Wanderers’ Clubhouse is also on the site.

It is understood that any objections to the move could put a timespan of up to five years before proposals can be approved. Plans are believed to be at an early stage with no application for planning yet been made.

No precise details have been revealed about costs but it is understood a new stadium would cost in excess of £10 million. Stuart MacLennan suggests costs could be an issue for the club:

“I do not know how it would be financed. If they can utilise for things other than rugby then that might help.  They would have to install a 3G pitch so other organisations could use it all year-round.”

A similar concept exists in Cardiff where the 13,000-capacity BT Sport Cardiff Arms Park is situated next to the Principality Stadium – the home of Welsh rugby.

Edinburgh Rugby officials refused to comment on the speculation.

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